My african safari

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prashantsingh
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Re: My african safari

Post by prashantsingh » Thu Mar 06, 2014 10:26 pm

Dear fanthumfan,
A lot has already been discussed here before and I really don't want to repeat the same again.
I have hunted in Africa, Argentina,England and recently in India where I was part of a team which shot a maneating leopard.

There is no doubt that hunting contributes to conservation.
Humans tend to equate everything for it's gross material value. A forest is worthwhile only if it is of any material value to us. Hunting generates the funds which are needed for the upkeep of the forest. India banned tiger hunting in the early 1970's and all forms of hunting in the 1980's.
Why has our wildlife not bounced back?
The reasons are many and I shall name a few.
People living on the outskirts of our jungles use the forests to collect firewood. Also as a feeding ground for their cattle. I have hundreds of snaps where you will see people stealing wood from the jungle and cattle grazing with wildboar/deer. Last sunday on my way back from Gwalior I stopped at Jhilmil jheel. A place famous for it's swamp deer (Barasingha). I spotted two herds of Barasingha. One was a bachelor herd with about 20 odd males. The other was a female herd with two beautiful males. This one consisted of more than 30 individuals. I was on a hill top and had a panoramic view of the jheel. I have taken snaps where the Barasingha are grouped together within the swamp while the cattle are grazing on the lush green maidaans belonging to the reserve.
You can pm me your e mail and I will send a couple of snaps .
It is heart breaking.
For a person living outside the forest. The only material value the forest has is free firewood and a free grazing ground for his cattle.

For a builder the forest is worthless. A builder in Borivali has more interest in making an appartment complex than saving forests. Yesterday I was reading an article about a leopard being chased out of a residential area by some stray dogs.

Every year forests are encroached upon to give way to "development". There was a lovely quote I saw on 'mundairs' facebook account the other day.
"Why is it that when we distroy any thing man made it is called vandalism. But when we distroy some thing created by nature it is called progress."

A miner is more interested in collecting sand and rocks from a dry river bed and distroying the spawning sites of the Mahaseer because the fish means nothing to him.
Few dams in the country have fish ladders. Who is bothered about fish when the dam is going to genertate X amount of electricity and irrigate Y sq kms of aggricultural land?
The only person who thinks about the fish is the angler and unfortunately they are outnumbered.

Roads and Rail tracks cut through our best forests. Every year we hear of elephants being cut down and killed by trains in Assam and Uttarakhand.

The Earth provides us enough for our Needs
But not enough for our Greed.

To add to all this is the poacher who kills and traps anything, everything , anytime. For the poacher there is no season.
A hunter on the other hand would hunt only in season. In olden days when hunting blocks were given out. The presence of a hunter was enough to keep the poachers away.
The forest is worthwhile only to a wildlife/nature enthusiast or a hunter.
and when you talk economics. One trophy hunter has a lesser (adverse) impact on the habitat (Carbon footprint) and pays much more than a hundred wildlife photographers would in a given time frame.

In Argentina , the only forests I saw were in the Game Reserve I was hunting. The rest of the Pampas has been cleared for farms.
The same goes for South Africa. Miles and Miles of farmland and Gold mines.

England today has more deer than they have ever had for centuries. The British Shooting and Conservation Assosiation says that more than a 1,00,000 deer have to be culled. To reduce our corbon footprints every farmer has to plant a certain number of trees. With no major predators (except man) on the island nation , the increase deer population has an adverse impact on aforestation programmes.
I shot 3.
A red Stag and 2 Roe deer. :)


Some years ago I met an old hunter in Corbett.
He used to come there every year in the winters till he died. He had travelled the world and had made enough money. What made him come back to a Forest Rest House with no electricity when he could as well spend the money in a 5 star resort.
His reply:
" Kya Karega Rakh ke Hera Sona Moti.
Kehte hain Kafan me jaib (pocket) nahi hoti."
He came here to listen to the music of the jungle. The bird songs and the alarm calls of the deer. Nothing gave him more pleasure than being close to nature.

BTW I am going for a photo safari to Dhikala. Corbett Tiger Reserve this week end.

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dr.jayakumar
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Re: My african safari

Post by dr.jayakumar » Fri Mar 07, 2014 9:40 am

Prasantsingh,
i am so happy for you.we live our dreams through you..one day maybe i can go for safari to africa.have you ever been to south india?in case you visit,do give a call.
regards
dr.jk

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brihacharan
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Re: My african safari

Post by brihacharan » Fri Mar 07, 2014 10:11 am

Prashant Singh wrote:
Some years ago I met an old hunter in Corbett.
He used to come there every year in the winters till he died. He had travelled the world and had made enough money. What made him come back to a Forest Rest House with no electricity when he could as well spend the money in a 5 star resort.
His reply:
" Kya Karega Rakh ke Hera Sona Moti.
Kehte hain Kafan me jaib (pocket) nahi hoti."
He came here to listen to the music of the jungle. The bird songs and the alarm calls of the deer. Nothing gave him more pleasure than being close to nature.


Hi Prashant,
> A very touching summation of a true human being's love for nature :D
> Allow me to share this with 'all'...
My nephew's Fr-in-Law who is an American recently retired as a Game Biologist in Idaho...
According to him in every forest area periodic surveys are conducted to assess the number of various fauna, their numbers, age, health etc.
Culling is a part of the maintenance program to ensure that the animals are healthy & get enough feed.
When their numbers exceed hunting licences are issued - the hunters prior to entering the forest are given an induction to identify those that can be bagged...
While exiting the hunters are required to check-in their 'bag' which then is measured & weighed the record of which is maintained...
> During extreme winters fodder is air dropped so that the animals don't starve!!!
> All this happens only because 'they care & protect' what nature has bestowed upon mankind - so that the future generations can enjoy and cherish the sights & sounds of nature!
Briha

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Re: My african safari

Post by fantumfan2003 » Fri Mar 07, 2014 11:45 am

Prashant,

Thanks for doing the explaining for me. :-)

Then you do realize that conservative hunters will be adding by the drop to a vast ocean in this country.

India is loosing its forest cover rapidly. The population, its economic power, its intelligence (or mediocrity) are playing in the hands of politicians, real estate developers and their unholy nexus.

Case in point, If the Shivsena can put in PIL to trap and relocate loepards in Aarey colony for votes from encroachers (mostly from south but increasingly from north and rural Maharashtra) , what can one say for the future of the leopard and conservation ? The conservative hunter is not even on the horizon.

Sure go ahead and call me a sceptic, but there is nothing that can be done about it.

These firangi conservation ideas will work for the firangs because they are more far sighted and brainy than us.

Not trying to put you down or anything but its a lost cause in this country.

May be Africa will hold out a little longer.

M.
prashantsingh wrote:Dear fnthumfan,
A lot has already been discussed here before and I really don't want to repeat the same again.
I have hunted in Africa, Argentina,England and recently in India where I was part of a team which shot a maneating leopard.

There is no doubt that hunting contributes to conservation.
Humans tend to equate everything for it's gross material value. A forest is worthwhile only if it is of any material value to us. Hunting generates the funds which are needed for the upkeep of the forest. India banned tiger hunting in the early 1970's and all forms of hunting in the 1980's.
Why has our wildlife not bounced back?
The reasons are many and I shall name a few.
People living on the outskirts of our jungles use the forests to collect firewood. Also as a feeding ground for their cattle. I have hundreds of snaps where you will see people stealing wood from the jungle and cattle grazing with wildboar/deer. Last sunday on my way back from Gwalior I stopped at Jhilmil jheel. A place famous for it's swamp deer (Barasingha). I spotted two herds of Barasingha. One was a bachelor herd with about 20 odd males. The other was a female herd with two beautiful males. This one consisted of more than 30 individuals. I was on a hill top and had a panoramic view of the jheel. I have taken snaps where the Barasingha are grouped together within the swamp while the cattle are grazing on the lush green maidaans belonging to the reserve.
You can pm me your e mail and I will send a couple of snaps .
It is heart breaking.
For a person living outside the forest. The only material value the forest has is free firewood and a free grazing ground for his cattle.

For a builder the forest is worthless. A builder in Borivali has more interest in making an appartment complex than saving forests. Yesterday I was reading an article about a leopard being chased out of a residential area by some stray dogs.

Every year forests are encroached upon to give way to "development". There was a lovely quote I saw on 'mundairs' facebook account the other day.
"Why is it that when we distroy any thing man made it is called vandalism. But when we distroy some thing created by nature it is called progress."

A miner is more interested in collecting sand and rocks from a dry river bed and distroying the spawning sites of the Mahaseer because the fish means nothing to him.
Few dams in the country have fish ladders. Who is bothered about fish when the dam is going to genertate X amount of electricity and irrigate Y sq kms of aggricultural land?
The only person who thinks about the fish is the angler and unfortunately they are outnumbered.

Roads and Rail tracks cut through our best forests. Every year we hear of elephants being cut down and killed by trains in Assam and Uttarakhand.

The Earth provides us enough for our Needs
But not enough for our Greed.

To add to all this is the poacher who kills and traps anything, everything , anytime. For the poacher there is no season.
A hunter on the other hand would hunt only in season. In olden days when hunting blocks were given out. The presence of a hunter was enough to keep the poachers away.
The forest is worthwhile only to a wildlife/nature enthusiast or a hunter.
and when you talk economics. One trophy hunter has a lesser (adverse) impact on the habitat (Carbon footprint) and pays much more than a hundred wildlife photographers would in a given time frame.

In Argentina , the only forests I saw were in the Game Reserve I was hunting. The rest of the Pampas has been cleared for farms.
The same goes for South Africa. Miles and Miles of farmland and Gold mines.

England today has more deer than they have ever had for centuries. The British Shooting and Conservation Assosiation says that more than a 1,00,000 deer have to be culled. To reduce our corbon footprints every farmer has to plant a certain number of trees. With no major predators (except man) on the island nation , the increase deer population has an adverse impact on aforestation programmes.
I shot 3.
A red Stag and 2 Roe deer. :)


Some years ago I met an old hunter in Corbett.
He used to come there every year in the winters till he died. He had travelled the world and had made enough money. What made him come back to a Forest Rest House with no electricity when he could as well spend the money in a 5 star resort.
His reply:
" Kya Karega Rakh ke Hera Sona Moti.
Kehte hain Kafan me jaib (pocket) nahi hoti."
He came here to listen to the music of the jungle. The bird songs and the alarm calls of the deer. Nothing gave him more pleasure than being close to nature.

BTW I am going for a photo safari to Dhikala. Corbett Tiger Reserve this week end.
As an example of overcoming adversity, Karoly Takacs has few peers. He was part of Hungary’s world champion pistol-shooting team in 1938, when an army grenade exploded, crippling his right hand. Ten years later, having taught himself to shoot with his left, he won two gold medals in the rapid-fire class.

Darr ke aage jeet hai

fantumfan2003
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Re: My african safari

Post by fantumfan2003 » Fri Mar 07, 2014 11:54 am

Doc,

And I sincerely hope you will carry a Nikon or a Canon with a 600mm lens on the Safari not a 375 Magnum like the rich and famous are doing from India.

M.
dr.jayakumar wrote:Prasantsingh,
i am so happy for you.we live our dreams through you..one day maybe i can go for safari to africa.have you ever been to south india?in case you visit,do give a call.
regards
dr.jk
As an example of overcoming adversity, Karoly Takacs has few peers. He was part of Hungary’s world champion pistol-shooting team in 1938, when an army grenade exploded, crippling his right hand. Ten years later, having taught himself to shoot with his left, he won two gold medals in the rapid-fire class.

Darr ke aage jeet hai

fantumfan2003
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Re: My african safari

Post by fantumfan2003 » Fri Mar 07, 2014 12:16 pm

Prashant,

Again, sincerely hoping this was for conservation and not sport but that last state sponsored free for all jamboree makes me have my doubts.

Trophy and sport hunting in Africa and here should be stopped.

M.
prashantsingh wrote: I have hunted in Africa, Argentina,England and recently in India where I was part of a team which shot a maneating leopard.

There is no doubt that hunting contributes to conservation.
As an example of overcoming adversity, Karoly Takacs has few peers. He was part of Hungary’s world champion pistol-shooting team in 1938, when an army grenade exploded, crippling his right hand. Ten years later, having taught himself to shoot with his left, he won two gold medals in the rapid-fire class.

Darr ke aage jeet hai

prashantsingh
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Re: My african safari

Post by prashantsingh » Fri Mar 07, 2014 3:33 pm

fantumfan2003 wrote:Prashant,

Again, sincerely hoping this was for conservation and not sport but that last state sponsored free for all jamboree makes me have my doubts.

Trophy and sport hunting in Africa and here should be stopped.
A lot of people have there reservations against Trophy Hunting.
I do not understand why?
A Trophy Hunter follows a very strict code of ethics. He does not shoot any animal that he comes across. On the contrary he carefully selects what he wants to shoot.
For a Hunter (and I have written this earlier) :
" What matters is not the trophy but the race.
Not the quarry , but the chase."
That's what sums up Hunting for me, and for most people who choose to hunt. It is the over all experience of spending time with nature , enjoying the bounty of nature and the beauty of the outdoors which is the pulling force. I am sure Briha Sir, Shooter, XL Target , Timmy , Two Rivers ,Baljit , Safarigent, Vikram and all those on this forum who have hunted legally will agree.
The "Trophy" is the end result and only a part of a wonderful overall experience.

As for the "state sponsored free for all jamboree" . If you are talking about the maneater we shot. Here is something interesting. The animal was shot on 2nd Nov 2013 in an area where there were at least 5 other leopards. The attacks on humans have stopped ever since. Though leopards are still being sighted in the area.

I do understand that conservation takes a back seat in a country with 120 crore people. But an honest effort should be made.
Before it is too late. India has a rich and diverse flora and fauna which should be preserved at ANY cost.
I strongly feel that one should have the National Parks on one side where hunting should not be allowed.
But on the other hand I also feel that Pvt Game Reserves can contribute to conservation in a significant way.
The Black Wilderbeast in South Africa were saved from extinction by Pvt Game Reserve owners.
I am only expressing my views and what I believe in.
This is a never ending topic .
There would always be people who are pro hunting and those against hunting.

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Re: My african safari

Post by fantumfan2003 » Fri Mar 07, 2014 3:59 pm

Here is what I dont like about trophy hunting.

1) The best looking animal is killed
2) Its dead head ends up in someone house. I would rather see that sexy looking dude alive and kicking in his natural habitat and me clicking it with my Nikon.
3) The hunter has done it for snob / show off value and narrates ever growing and increasingly unbelievable stories of the killing to the wannabes. Oh these hunters are one phekuchand lot I tell ya.

Will continue later.....

M.

P.S. Its fantumfan. No need for the 'h' :-)
prashantsingh wrote:
fantumfan2003 wrote:Prashant,

Again, sincerely hoping this was for conservation and not sport but that last state sponsored free for all jamboree makes me have my doubts.

Trophy and sport hunting in Africa and here should be stopped.
A lot of people have there reservations against Trophy Hunting.
I do not understand why?
A Trophy Hunter follows a very strict code of ethics. He does not shoot any animal that he comes across. On the contrary he carefully selects what he wants to shoot.
For a Hunter (and I have written this earlier) :
" What matters is not the trophy but the race.
Not the quarry , but the chase."
That's what sums up Hunting for me, and for most people who choose to hunt. It is the over all experience of spending time with nature , enjoying the bounty of nature and the beauty of the outdoors which is the pulling force. I am sure Briha Sir, Shooter, XL Target , Timmy , Two Rivers ,Baljit , Safarigent, Vikram and all those on this forum who have hunted legally will agree.
The "Trophy" is the end result and only a part of a wonderful overall experience.

As for the "state sponsored free for all jamboree" . If you are talking about the maneater we shot. Here is something interesting. The animal was shot on 2nd Nov 2013 in an area where there were at least 5 other leopards. The attacks on humans have stopped ever since. Though leopards are still being sighted in the area.

I do understand that conservation takes a back seat in a country with 120 crore people. But an honest effort should be made.
Before it is too late. India has a rich and diverse flora and fauna which should be preserved at ANY cost.
I strongly feel that one should have the National Parks on one side where hunting should not be allowed.
But on the other hand I also feel that Pvt Game Reserves can contribute to conservation in a significant way.
The Black Wilderbeast in South Africa were saved from extinction by Pvt Game Reserve owners.
I am only expressing my views and what I believe in.
This is a never ending topic .
There would always be people who are pro hunting and those against hunting.
Last edited by fantumfan2003 on Fri Mar 07, 2014 4:16 pm, edited 2 times in total.
As an example of overcoming adversity, Karoly Takacs has few peers. He was part of Hungary’s world champion pistol-shooting team in 1938, when an army grenade exploded, crippling his right hand. Ten years later, having taught himself to shoot with his left, he won two gold medals in the rapid-fire class.

Darr ke aage jeet hai

fantumfan2003
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Re: My african safari

Post by fantumfan2003 » Fri Mar 07, 2014 4:11 pm

Honest conservation can only happen in this country if its mantris, babus, FD, real estate developers, Chinese animal parts prescribing quacks, Let's keep it clean - moderator and other greedy people have a change of heart.

But thats like me wishing to have a harem in this lifetime i.e.

Not happening.

Take plenty of pics to show them to our grand children while these magnificient creatures are still around.

M.
As an example of overcoming adversity, Karoly Takacs has few peers. He was part of Hungary’s world champion pistol-shooting team in 1938, when an army grenade exploded, crippling his right hand. Ten years later, having taught himself to shoot with his left, he won two gold medals in the rapid-fire class.

Darr ke aage jeet hai

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brihacharan
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Re: My african safari

Post by brihacharan » Fri Mar 07, 2014 4:44 pm

It's sad that noble & honorable intentions sometimes get misconstrued and there are those who manipulate the laws through nepotism & malpractices to their own advantage.
Wildlife management suffers because those responsible for it are either ill informed or bear an apathy towards it or even succumb to the wills & fancies of those who are bent on flaunting the rules.

As Prashant says this 'subject' invariably leads to endless debates - often ending up with no conclusive agreement or acceptance. People are entitled to their opinions - however laws are enacted keeping in mind the larger interest of the society, country etc.

> Given below is an extract of an article on Wildlife Management published by the state of Michigan USA...
> Some may agree & some may not but the fact remains that it elicits some food for thought....

Department of Natural Resources – Michigan USA
Hunting and wildlife conservation go hand in hand

Dec. 27, 2012

How does hunting contribute to wildlife conservation?
Hunters help conserve and manage wildlife in three ways…
1.Hunting is an important management tool. For many wildlife species, hunting helps to maintain populations at levels compatible with human activity, land use and available habitat. For example, hunting helps limit deer browse in agricultural areas and deer-car collisions. Hunting may also help your garden from getting eaten by deer.

2.Hunters pay for the bulk of wildlife conservation across the country through the Pittman-Robertson Act, or PR. Established in 1937, this act created an excise tax on guns, ammunition, bows, arrows and other hunting-related equipment. This money is then apportioned to state wildlife agencies based on the land area and the number of licensed hunters of each state. These funds are matched by state hunting license fees. PR ensures that money from hunting license sales can only be used for wildlife management & for projects such as conducting research, wildlife reintroductions and improving wildlife habitat. These projects benefit a wide range of species, including animals that aren't hunted. In Michigan, hunters pay for approximately 80 percent of the Department of Natural Resources' wildlife management.

3.Hunters have banded together in local sportsmen's clubs and national organizations to raise funds for conservation, buy and conserve private lands for wildlife habitat, partner with state and federal agencies on large-scale conservation, and lobby for laws and policies that benefit wildlife.

So thank a hunter you know for helping to conserve wildlife for all of Michigan's citizens!
Briha

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Re: My african safari

Post by fantumfan2003 » Fri Mar 07, 2014 4:50 pm

Prashant,

Honestly, that is a very poor, even a lame excuse for justifying hunting. Obviously hunters are the only ones who would agree with that, even the phekuchand ones.

It sounds so hollow if one were to say "I kill animals in a jungle because it helps me to enjoy nature"

I also spend time with nature and in jungles but its with a Nikon D80 not a hunting gun/rifle.

This kind of talk will not even help you in telling someone that you are into conservation, which I also was into until enough was enough.

M.
prashantsingh wrote:for most people who choose to hunt. It is the over all experience of spending time with nature , enjoying the bounty of nature and the beauty of the outdoors which is the pulling force. I am sure Briha Sir, Shooter, XL Target , Timmy , Two Rivers ,Baljit , Safarigent, Vikram and all those on this forum who have hunted legally will agree.
The "Trophy" is the end result and only a part of a wonderful overall experience.
As an example of overcoming adversity, Karoly Takacs has few peers. He was part of Hungary’s world champion pistol-shooting team in 1938, when an army grenade exploded, crippling his right hand. Ten years later, having taught himself to shoot with his left, he won two gold medals in the rapid-fire class.

Darr ke aage jeet hai

fantumfan2003
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Re: My african safari

Post by fantumfan2003 » Fri Mar 07, 2014 4:56 pm

I am not debating or conceding that this is a never ending conversations. And as I said before, these amrikan ideas will work in amrika and not here because of population, deforestation, encroachment, human greed and a whole lot of other issues.

Based on this Michigan masala, there is definitely a case for culling wild boar and may be blue bull. But knowing Indian greed, the two species will be extinct in no time and causing " god knows what " problems.

M.
brihacharan wrote:It's sad that noble & honorable intentions sometimes get misconstrued and there are those who manipulate the laws through nepotism & malpractices to their own advantage.
Wildlife management suffers because those responsible for it are either ill informed or bear an apathy towards it or even succumb to the wills & fancies of those who are bent on flaunting the rules.

As Prashant says this 'subject' invariably leads to endless debates - often ending up with no conclusive agreement or acceptance. People are entitled to their opinions - however laws are enacted keeping in mind the larger interest of the society, country etc.

> Given below is an extract of an article on Wildlife Management published by the state of Michigan USA...
> Some may agree & some may not but the fact remains that it elicits some food for thought....

Department of Natural Resources – Michigan USA
Hunting and wildlife conservation go hand in hand

Dec. 27, 2012

How does hunting contribute to wildlife conservation?
Hunters help conserve and manage wildlife in three ways…
1.Hunting is an important management tool. For many wildlife species, hunting helps to maintain populations at levels compatible with human activity, land use and available habitat. For example, hunting helps limit deer browse in agricultural areas and deer-car collisions. Hunting may also help your garden from getting eaten by deer.

2.Hunters pay for the bulk of wildlife conservation across the country through the Pittman-Robertson Act, or PR. Established in 1937, this act created an excise tax on guns, ammunition, bows, arrows and other hunting-related equipment. This money is then apportioned to state wildlife agencies based on the land area and the number of licensed hunters of each state. These funds are matched by state hunting license fees. PR ensures that money from hunting license sales can only be used for wildlife management & for projects such as conducting research, wildlife reintroductions and improving wildlife habitat. These projects benefit a wide range of species, including animals that aren't hunted. In Michigan, hunters pay for approximately 80 percent of the Department of Natural Resources' wildlife management.

3.Hunters have banded together in local sportsmen's clubs and national organizations to raise funds for conservation, buy and conserve private lands for wildlife habitat, partner with state and federal agencies on large-scale conservation, and lobby for laws and policies that benefit wildlife.

So thank a hunter you know for helping to conserve wildlife for all of Michigan's citizens!
Briha
As an example of overcoming adversity, Karoly Takacs has few peers. He was part of Hungary’s world champion pistol-shooting team in 1938, when an army grenade exploded, crippling his right hand. Ten years later, having taught himself to shoot with his left, he won two gold medals in the rapid-fire class.

Darr ke aage jeet hai

fantumfan2003
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Re: My african safari

Post by fantumfan2003 » Fri Mar 07, 2014 5:10 pm

I just remembered you saying that you used to hunt when it was legal.

Why would you say that its a debate ? You ought to have been clear of your own intentions and actions on hunting.

M.
brihacharan wrote:It's sad that noble & honorable intentions sometimes get misconstrued and there are those who manipulate the laws through nepotism & malpractices to their own advantage.
Wildlife management suffers because those responsible for it are either ill informed or bear an apathy towards it or even succumb to the wills & fancies of those who are bent on flaunting the rules.

As Prashant says this 'subject' invariably leads to endless debates - often ending up with no conclusive agreement or acceptance. People are entitled to their opinions - however laws are enacted keeping in mind the larger interest of the society, country etc.

> Given below is an extract of an article on Wildlife Management published by the state of Michigan USA...
> Some may agree & some may not but the fact remains that it elicits some food for thought....

Department of Natural Resources – Michigan USA
Hunting and wildlife conservation go hand in hand

Dec. 27, 2012

How does hunting contribute to wildlife conservation?
Hunters help conserve and manage wildlife in three ways…
1.Hunting is an important management tool. For many wildlife species, hunting helps to maintain populations at levels compatible with human activity, land use and available habitat. For example, hunting helps limit deer browse in agricultural areas and deer-car collisions. Hunting may also help your garden from getting eaten by deer.

2.Hunters pay for the bulk of wildlife conservation across the country through the Pittman-Robertson Act, or PR. Established in 1937, this act created an excise tax on guns, ammunition, bows, arrows and other hunting-related equipment. This money is then apportioned to state wildlife agencies based on the land area and the number of licensed hunters of each state. These funds are matched by state hunting license fees. PR ensures that money from hunting license sales can only be used for wildlife management & for projects such as conducting research, wildlife reintroductions and improving wildlife habitat. These projects benefit a wide range of species, including animals that aren't hunted. In Michigan, hunters pay for approximately 80 percent of the Department of Natural Resources' wildlife management.

3.Hunters have banded together in local sportsmen's clubs and national organizations to raise funds for conservation, buy and conserve private lands for wildlife habitat, partner with state and federal agencies on large-scale conservation, and lobby for laws and policies that benefit wildlife.

So thank a hunter you know for helping to conserve wildlife for all of Michigan's citizens!
Briha
As an example of overcoming adversity, Karoly Takacs has few peers. He was part of Hungary’s world champion pistol-shooting team in 1938, when an army grenade exploded, crippling his right hand. Ten years later, having taught himself to shoot with his left, he won two gold medals in the rapid-fire class.

Darr ke aage jeet hai

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Re: My african safari

Post by brihacharan » Fri Mar 07, 2014 5:21 pm

[quote="fantumfan2003"]
I just remembered you saying that you used to hunt when it was legal.
Why would you say that its a debate ? You ought to have been clear of your own intentions and actions on hunting.
M.

> Debate is the result of "Creating an Issue" ...
> My intentions were very clear, so was my conscience, of which I happen to be its sole custodian!
Briha

fantumfan2003
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Re: My african safari

Post by fantumfan2003 » Fri Mar 07, 2014 5:34 pm

And what were they ?

Besides you said its an unending debate where as you shoukd have been supporting the pro hunter team.

M.
brihacharan wrote:
fantumfan2003 wrote: I just remembered you saying that you used to hunt when it was legal.
Why would you say that its a debate ? You ought to have been clear of your own intentions and actions on hunting.
M.

> Debate is the result of "Creating an Issue" ...
> My intentions were very clear, so was my conscience, of which I happen to be its sole custodian!
Briha
As an example of overcoming adversity, Karoly Takacs has few peers. He was part of Hungary’s world champion pistol-shooting team in 1938, when an army grenade exploded, crippling his right hand. Ten years later, having taught himself to shoot with his left, he won two gold medals in the rapid-fire class.

Darr ke aage jeet hai

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