game recipes?

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arre yaar...

Postby dev » Fri Jul 27, 2007 5:52 pm

You will need to catch pomfrets...

:mrgreen:


Rub it in. Even if we were at sea, bet we'd just catch fingerlings! ;-)

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Re: arre yaar...

Postby Mack The Knife » Fri Jul 27, 2007 6:40 pm

dev wrote:
Rub it in. Even if we were at sea, bet we'd just catch fingerlings! ;-)

Dev


With or without the green chutney?
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Postby ngrewal » Sat Jul 28, 2007 6:58 am

Pomfrets we can buy them in states too..for now red snapper will do ...( excuse me if I was wrong in making comparison)
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Postby dev » Sat Jul 28, 2007 2:00 pm

Okay Sri Bana you can add the green chutney and delhi is steaming us anyway. ;-)

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Postby shooter » Sun Jul 29, 2007 2:48 am

sorry for the late reply guys.
yes grumpy i have tried wood pigeon. very good.
(was frozen not fresh : we indians believe fresh-not hung- tastes better)

jain/ marwari cuisine in india has no onion garlic. it is veg but if one tries it, one will find he might eat his hand along with the food- some of the dishes taste so good.

thanks to my other friends, lets keep the recipes rolling.
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Postby snIPer » Wed Nov 21, 2007 4:47 pm

How To Cook Shot Pigeons (Recipes)
http://www.pigeonwatch.co.uk/recipes.htm
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Postby theta » Sat Feb 02, 2008 5:56 pm

Rustam Bana wrote:Okay. What type of partridges are they selling? I think there may be a law that precludes the commercial breeding of indigenous game birds and these may not be the Indian variety.

Rustam


don think they legal but they definately the regular brown partridge u see in the fields..... in bombay on Md Ali RD u get both partridge and quail frm the roadside "thelas"....i've had it and its amazing
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Postby mundaire » Sat Feb 02, 2008 6:07 pm

It's actually the "Grey partridge" usually found in more arid areas the other common variety in India is the Black partridge which is found in "wetter"/ more widely irrigated areas... the females and young of both types are brown in colour...
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Postby casual shooter » Sat Feb 02, 2008 7:16 pm

when we used to go hunting we used to take
surgical gloves for skinning
grounded jeera powder and red chil;lies
salt and black pepper
after skinning the game mix it with above ingrdiants and put it on slow fire the fat will melt and then some water till u try your luck with some booze
cook thew stuff and eat it with pav
fish can be wrapped in aluminium papper and dug in sand and camp fire lit on it after some time take it out it is ready to eat small game like rabbit etc can be treated in the same way.
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Re: game recipes?

Postby Safarigent » Sun Jul 24, 2011 9:21 pm

found the right place, thanks shooter


speaking to a relative, got this recipe out from an old notebook he had.
i havent tried it out yet. he said it could be used for all game. no prior preparation required except for water fowl, to marinate, use raw papaya or carry some vinegar.
this is per kg of meat.


onions 250 gms
garlic 8 flakes
ginger 1 small piece
turmeric 1 tsp
garam masala 2 tbsp
tomatoes 100 gm
ghee 200 gm
red chillies, salt to taste
chop onions and tomatoes into small pieces. grind rest of ingredients except coarsely.
heat ghee and add the above made masala.
add onions, fry till onions are light brown.
add tomatoes, fry for 5 minutes.
add meat on slow heat and simmer till meat is soft and masala separates from the ghee.
incase the meat is still hard, add some more water and simmer until required.

i am gonna try it out on some mutton and let you know how it went.
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Re: game recipes?

Postby TwoRivers » Mon Jul 25, 2011 12:47 am

When I'm doing the cooking, instead of the missus, my favorite is curried moose stew. But I'm afraid moose would be hard to come by for any of you.
Most important, in my opinion, is not to overcook any game meat, and how it has been handled in the field. Cutting it up with a chainsaw to speed up butchering is not the best way.
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Re: game recipes?

Postby xl_target » Mon Jul 25, 2011 12:28 pm

Something my grandmother used to make still makes my mouth water every time I think about it. A dish fit for a King.

She used a piece of skinned Hilsa fish steamed in a small stainless steel container with a tightly fitting lid (like a tiffin box). Into the tin she put a little bit of water and some freshly ground mustard (Shorshe or Sarsa?). The whole thing was then cooked till the fish is soft. The steam from the water forces the mustard into the fish and gives it a very subtle and delicate taste.
Hilsa (Ileesh Mach) is a freshwater fish that is available in West Bengal. I have never seen it available anywhere else.

Another problem with Hilsa is that it has very fine, almost hair-like bones and if you are not a Bong, used to eating fish every day, you are going to get some of those bones stuck in your throat.
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Re: game recipes?

Postby shooter » Mon Jul 25, 2011 12:48 pm

I believe you are referring to the famous bengali dish shorshe bataar maach (fish with mustard). It is out of the world tasty.
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Re: game recipes?

Postby xl_target » Tue Jul 26, 2011 12:06 am

Yup, Shooter, I believe that is it.
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Re: game recipes?

Postby mundaire » Thu Dec 22, 2011 1:08 pm

Gamebird curry in red wine marinade
(medium spicy)

Ingredients
4 full size partridges (you can substitute with quail/ pheasant/ pigeon - but compensate accordingly for size/ weight variations)
1 cup red wine (wine that is slightly "off" seems to work well also)
3 tablespoons ghee (preferable) or vegetable oil
1 Teaspoon coriander (dhania) powder
2 onions – chopped finely
1.5 Teaspoon garlic paste
1.5 Teaspoon ginger paste
3 fresh green chillies finely chopped - vary based on taste, go higher if you want it hotter
1 pack (200grams) Tomato purée
gamebird stock - can substitute with chicken stock
3 bay leaves (Tez patta)
Salt to taste

Garam masala powder
1 Teaspoon cumin (jeera) seeds
2 Teaspoon coriander (dhania) seeds
1 Teaspoon fennel (badi saunf) seeds
8-12 black peppercorns (kali mirch) - vary based on taste, feel free to go higher if you want it hotter
1 inch piece cinnamon (dal chini) stick
6 cardamoms (badi elaichi)
4 cloves (long)

1 bunch freshly chopped coriander (hara dhania) - for garnish

Method
Debone the birds
Mix the garlic with the red wine and put the meat in - allow to marinate for 12 hours (less if you have hung the meat for a period of time)
With the leftover bones etc. prepare your stock

Heat the ghee/ oil in a deep pot/ pressure cooker/ wok - if you are using vegetable oil, add a teaspoon of ghee for flavour
Add the bay leaves and allow them to brown
Add the onions and allow to cook on medium heat

Preparing the garam masala:-
Heat the ingredients in a dry frying pan on medium flame stirring constantly so they roast evenly - do this till they begin to smoke
Allow to cool and then grind to a power using a blender

When the onions are about half done add the garam masala powder & ginger paste mix well and fry till the onions are done (they will turn golden brown)
Now add the tomato puree, coriander powder and chopped green chillis and mix well, allowing the entire mixture to fry for several minutes on low heat (stir every few minutes)
Now add the marinated meat along with the marinade left over in the utensil - mix well and fry at medium heat for 10-15 minutes
Now bring the stock (made earlier) to a boil and add to the mixture stirring it in well
Add salt to taste
Cover the utensil and turn the heat down to low and allow to cook till the meat is done, stir every 5 minutes or so

Once done, garnish with chopped green coriander leaves and serve with rotis or white rice

Cheers!
Abhijeet

Please NOTE:- All forms of hunting are now banned in India, this recipe is posted here for the benefit of those members who live overseas and who still have access to game meat. Indian members could try substituting the meat with that of desi murga, vary the quantities accordingly.
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