.33 Winchester

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Re: .33 Winchester

Post by BowMan » Sat Sep 22, 2012 8:03 pm

Reloading - Now is that Legal in India?

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Re: .33 Winchester

Post by TC » Sat Sep 22, 2012 10:36 pm

Timmy ..... you are a very good writer


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Re: .33 Winchester

Post by goodboy_mentor » Sat Sep 22, 2012 10:48 pm

Reloading - Now is that Legal in India?
Yes it is legal for arms license holders but sourcing the powders etc. is a problem.
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Re: .33 Winchester

Post by cottage cheese » Sun Sep 23, 2012 1:14 am

goodboy_mentor wrote:
Reloading - Now is that Legal in India?
Yes it is legal for arms license holders but sourcing the powders etc. is a problem.
Reloading in the Indian context, presumably from the establishment's point of view, has always leaned towards the assumption that it would relate largely to reloading of 12Bore are similar cartridges, that too with black-powder, corrosive percussion caps and other Muzzle loading paraphernalia, even the 'equipment' specifically mentioned in notifications relate to those used in reloading of shot-shells. Earlier one could be allowed reasonable quantities of powder, cap and ball on a 12Bore BL license... the facility has for all practical purposes disappeared in recent years. Quite typically, the issue of reloading being somewhat ill-defined by law, it would be daunting for most gun owners to indulge in this 'luxury', let alone trying to source smokeless powder, jacketed bullets, and non-corrosive primers for any center fire cartridge other than the 'traditional' barah gaz kartoos .... :)
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Re: .33 Winchester

Post by goodboy_mentor » Sun Sep 23, 2012 2:01 am

even the 'equipment' specifically mentioned in notifications relate to those used in reloading of shot-shells.
If anyone could share the contents of the notification. If this thread is read http://indiansforguns.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=3773 the Notification appears to be G.S.R. 991.
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Re: .33 Winchester

Post by cottage cheese » Mon Sep 24, 2012 8:30 pm

goodboy_mentor wrote:
even the 'equipment' specifically mentioned in notifications relate to those used in reloading of shot-shells.
If anyone could share the contents of the notification. If this thread is read http://indiansforguns.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=3773 the Notification appears to be G.S.R. 991.
Hey GBM,.... Sorry for the late turn around. Yes, your link has exactly what was yapping about... Putting it simply, appears as item No. 1(2) Under Schedule II, Arms & Ammunition Exclusions.

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Re: .33 Winchester

Post by miroflex » Thu Sep 27, 2012 9:25 pm

Hi All,

Is there anyone on this forum who owns or has owned or knows of anyone who has owned a .33 Winchester?

Regards.
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Re: .33 Winchester

Post by TwoRivers » Mon Oct 01, 2012 8:34 am

miroflex: Not anymore, but I have in the past. I have always been fond of both the cartridge and the rifle, but kept selling them, hoping for an M1886 Lightweight in near perfect condition, at a decent price. Never found it, though. The .33 WCF seemed to be one of the few cartridges that actually delivered the claimed ballistics. Used to be quite popular in Alaska, but the rifles here are usually well worn. And no bargain.

Until a few years ago one of our bullet makers made a 200 grain flat point bullet especially for this cartridge, but it has been discontinued. (I think one custom bullet maker still lists a .338 200 grain flat point.) If not, you would have to file the lead nose off a roundnose bullet and add a cannelure, or go for a cast lead bullet. Cases are no problem, since it is a necked down .45-70 case.

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Re: .33 Winchester

Post by miroflex » Thu Oct 11, 2012 10:01 pm

TwoRivers wrote:miroflex: Not anymore, but I have in the past. I have always been fond of both the cartridge and the rifle, but kept selling them, hoping for an M1886 Lightweight in near perfect condition, at a decent price. Never found it, though. The .33 WCF seemed to be one of the few cartridges that actually delivered the claimed ballistics. Used to be quite popular in Alaska, but the rifles here are usually well worn. And no bargain.

Until a few years ago one of our bullet makers made a 200 grain flat point bullet especially for this cartridge, but it has been discontinued. (I think one custom bullet maker still lists a .338 200 grain flat point.) If not, you would have to file the lead nose off a roundnose bullet and add a cannelure, or go for a cast lead bullet. Cases are no problem, since it is a necked down .45-70 case.
Two Rivers,

It is good to have your views on the .33 Winchester cartridge and the model 1886 Lightweight rifle. It buttreses my own high opinion of the rifle and the cartridge.

Reloading is a difficult proposition in India, given the almost complete absence of reloading equipment and supplies. I would love to own the rifle but am afraid that ammunition will be an unmanageable proposition. I may therefore have to regretfully give up the idea of buying the rifle. The .45-70 Government is almost unknown in India.
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Re: .33 Winchester

Post by miroflex » Thu Jun 27, 2013 8:36 pm

goodboy_mentor wrote:Unless you have some means to reload the cartridges, it is better to avoid buying this rifle.

If you want to buy this rifle without ammunition as an antiquity then you may go ahead if it is not less than 100 years old, since firearms not less than 100 years do not require a license under Arms Act 1959. Instead you will have to register it under the Antiquities and Art Treasures Act, 1972.
I have been pondering over your advice Goodboy_Mentor. Do 100 year old weapons have to be deactivated to qualify for exemption from licencing requirements under the Arms Act?

Regards.
"To the man who loves art for its own sake, it is frequently in its least important and lowliest manifestations that the keenest pleasure is to be derived." Sherlock Holmes in "The Adventure Of The Copper Beeches" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

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Re: .33 Winchester

Post by Safarigent » Thu Jun 27, 2013 9:18 pm

Please read section 45 of the arms act. Only fire arms of antiquatian value which cant be used with or without repairs dont need an arms license.
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Re: .33 Winchester

Post by goodboy_mentor » Fri Jun 28, 2013 11:04 pm

I have been pondering over your advice Goodboy_Mentor. Do 100 year old weapons have to be deactivated to qualify for exemption from licencing requirements under the Arms Act?
I do not think they have to be deactivated. There is a lawyer from Chennai on this forum who reportedly has a number of antiquarian firearms with him. I am not able to recall his id, his name is Mr. Pandian. Related thread can be read in this link http://indiansforguns.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=15556
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Re: .33 Winchester

Post by Safarigent » Sat Jun 29, 2013 12:08 am

Section 45C of the Indian Arms Act states that:

any weapon of an obsolete pattern or of antiquarian value or in disrepair which is not capable of being used as a Firearm either or without repair;

I dont see how you can get around this. To keep an antique firearm, even if it 200 years old and is capable of discharging projectiles, it has to be registered on an arms license. If it cant be utilized as a firearm, with or without repair, then it needs a certificate from the ASI.
Its as simple as that
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Re: .33 Winchester

Post by goodboy_mentor » Sat Jun 29, 2013 9:29 am

Please read Section 45(c) again carefully. It mentions three conditions separated by "or".

any weapon(means arms or firearms) -
1) of an obsolete pattern

or

2) of antiquarian value

or

3) in disrepair which is not capable of being used as a Firearm either or without repair;

If any one condition is satisfied, Arms Act 1959 does not apply.

Mr. Pandian on this forum has about 50 such antique pieces. Please read his reply in this post http://indiansforguns.com/viewtopic.php ... 17#p157917
"If my mother tongue is shaking the foundations of your State, it probably means that you built your State on my land" - Musa Anter, Kurdish writer, assassinated by the Turkish secret services in 1992

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