Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Past and future planned - events/ outings/ training sessions/ offline meets/ camps/ matches etc.
User avatar
Vikram
We post a lot
We post a lot
Posts: 4489
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2006 6:14 am
Location: Tbilisi,Georgia

Re: Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Post by Vikram » Wed Aug 28, 2013 4:08 pm

Keep them coming!
It ain’t over ’til it’s over! "Rocky,Rocky,Rocky....."

For Advertising mail webmaster
User avatar
xl_target
Old Timer
Old Timer
Posts: 3480
Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 7:47 am
Location: USA

Re: Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Post by xl_target » Thu Aug 29, 2013 8:48 am

CK Left Minnesota early this morning.
We'll let him get settled back down and then he will continue his part of the narrative.

There is plenty more to come like this little scene below:

Image
Hmm! What are these Indians consorting with a bunch of Nazi's for?

There is stuff coming that will make you drool.
Stay tuned and find out........
“Never give in, never give in, never; never; never; never – in nothing, great or small, large or petty – never give in except to convictions of honor and good sense” — Winston Churchill, Oct 29, 1941

ckkalyan
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 1420
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 10:37 pm
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Contact:

Re: Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Post by ckkalyan » Fri Aug 30, 2013 1:23 am

Sat, 24th the Morning after the Overnight Camping in Minneopa Park

I had a truly relaxing sleep in the two-man Coleman tent, in a soft, red sleeping bag with a pad below - ‘hard beds and soft battles’  I woke up around 9:30 am to the forest sounds of chirping birds and whispering leaves. I was alone in the tent - XL probably had gotten off to an early start. I gathered my spectacles and unzipped the tent and found XL busy by the camp table.

Image

He says “The eggs are ready to cook, coffee will be on soon – by the time you get back from the washroom”

When I am back XL as per his forecast did indeed have delicious scrambled eggs prepared with onions, mushrooms, salt and pepper, coffee was brewing in a steel percolator perched on the little portable Micro Coleman Stove. What a marvellous piece of equipment…a tiny can of gas topped by a screw on, burner with a variable gas control knob and collapsing dish support. A must have for any outdoor enthusiast.

Image
Lords of all we survey.. not very much actually :)

The leisurely breakfast over, the last drop of strong coffee drained, we started preparations for departure, dismantling the tent, packing up and stowing away. We cleaned up the camp area thoroughly, collecting garbage and making sure we left no debris. We pulled off the Campsite No 14 ‘Occupied’ sign and headed out of Minneopa. It had been beyond doubt, a memorable overnight outing with a fellow IFG’ian.

XL suggested that we head back home for a quick shower before attacking the rest of the day’s planned activity.

Only then did I realize that I did have a few bug bites – they must have been mightily attracted by my shiny cranium and enjoyed the taste of blood in my alcohol stream! ;-)

Our next stop was the Schell’s Brewery in New Ulm and historic Fort Ridgley.

Schell’s Brewery has a line up of regular award winning beers and is one of the top ten breweries in the United States. Although we missed the tour here is a link to virtual 3D Tour of Schell’s

http://www.schellsbrewery.com/tour_virtual.php

A brief History:
August Schell was born in 1828 in Durbach, Germany, located in the heart of the famous German "Schwarzwald," otherwise known as the Black Forest region. August received an early education as a machinist/engineer but after a short time, became intrigued by the opportunities overseas. In 1848, August bid farewell to his mother and father, leaving his homeland in search of success in the United States.
August arrived in New Orleans and continued up the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers to Cincinnati where he worked as a machinist in a locomotive factory. It was here that he met the love of his life, Theresa Hermann. Theresa, also a German immigrant, and August wed in 1853.

In 1856, August, Theresa and their two baby daughters headed to Minnesota along with a group of fellow Germans known as the Cincinnati Turner Society. The Turner Society had heard from a group of German settlers in Southern Minnesota that their settlement was struggling to succeed. The two groups merged and formed the town of New Ulm.

Link here http://www.schellsbrewery.com/history.php

We then wandered around their hospitality complex which was painstakingly built into a museum. The effect was of being taken back in time was astonishing - the way the old equipment, machinery and processes were so well preserved and presented astounded us.

Schell’s was crowded, full of people and tourists on that day; we had to pick our way carefully thorough the crush and exhibits. We did take a few pictures here but not enough. There was the well preserved, original horse drawn distribution cart with beer barrels slung all around as well as on top. I was sorely tempted to buy some of the beautiful souvenirs like tankards but I reluctantly had to desist due to a lack of room in my luggage.

We then drove off to Fort Ridgely where another historical treat awaited us.

Fort Ridgely was a United States Army outpost (1853–1867) near the Dakota reservation in south western Minnesota (located near Fairfax). Built between 1853–1855, it played an important role in the Dakota War of 1862.[2] The Battle of Fort Ridgely was fought there in two engagements over August 20–22, 1862 between Army volunteers and refugees from the Minnesota River valley, and Dakota forces.
The Army abandoned the Fort in 1867 and moved westward. Civilians occupied the remaining buildings and later dismantled the structures for their own use.

Today the building foundations are preserved by the Nicollet County Historical Society and owned by the Minnesota Historical Society within the boundaries of Fort Ridgely State Park. The old commissary building (partially reconstructed by the Veteran Conservation Corps in the 1930s) now houses the museum. The fort was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970, while much of the park was added in 1989.


Source http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Ridgely

We first were shown a short film explaining the construction of the structure, details of soldiers who staffed it and then events leading up to the historical attack by the Dakota Sioux. Our attention was also drawn to a US flag of the period with only 38 stars depicted!

Image
Typical dress for the soldiers in the Dakota War


Image
A Springfield rifled musket

Image
The Colt 1860 Army

We strolled around the museum examining displays of revolvers, cannons and other arms, equipment, old tintypes, sketches and a really well executed miniature scale model of the fort and surroundings. The caretaker of the museum gave us a commentary on the model while pointing out the interesting features cross referencing to the short film.

We took our time, leisurely exploring the actual excavated remnants of the foundations of the fort and thence the nearby well maintained cemetery.

So much to see and so little time; we realized that we had to forego some of the other related sites of the Dakota Sioux and headed back.
When guns are outlawed, only outlaws will have guns!

ckkalyan
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 1420
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 10:37 pm
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Contact:

Re: Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Post by ckkalyan » Fri Aug 30, 2013 1:31 am

Thank you very much for your kind comments and encouragement brihacharan-Ji, Vikram, and dev

Vikram Thanks for pointing that out. Yes, I realized that when I had a chance to weigh myself at XL's place. I had lost about 15 kilos since Aug 2011! I now weigh a more appropriate, 70 kg (154 lbs) :D

My internet connection has been intermittent and hence the delay in posting, adding images...my apologies

:cheers:
When guns are outlawed, only outlaws will have guns!

User avatar
timmy
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 1950
Joined: Mon Dec 08, 2008 7:03 am
Location: I'm a Nuevo Mexicano

Re: Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Post by timmy » Fri Aug 30, 2013 3:28 am

xl_target wrote:Saturday 24th, August, 2013
Image
Call out the Big Guns!

This cannon is, I'm sure, a Model 1841 Mountain Howitzer. Here is the wiki on this weapon:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M1841_Mountain_Howitzer

I have found these interesting because they show up in all sorts of places on the Western USA. For instance, there are two replicas in Albuquerque's Old Town Plaza. Here is the fascinating story about them:
The Mountain Howitzer was one of the most effective weapons employed by the U.S. Army Cavalry during the latter part of the 1800′s. The Mountain Howitzer was essentially a compact cannon that could easily be taken along by cavalry units on the field. Ironically, it was the Mountain Howitzer that was not taken along by George Armstrong Custer during the Sioux War of 1876. If he had not declined bringing along this weapon the history books may have been written differently. The Mountain Howitzer’s compact size and portability was ideal for such cavalry expeditions.

The Mountain Howitzer was built in several styles, with the 12 pound gun probably the most used in the frontier west. Being first designed in Sweden during the latter 17th century, the practical utility of this weapon goes back to Europe and the Peninsular War when the Spaniards used these weapons against Napoleon. That war began in 1808 and ened with Napoleon’s defeat in 1814.

In America, the Mountain Howitzer saw action in the Mexican-American War, the Civil War and during the various western Indian wars. The Mountain Howitzer got it’s name because the original cannons were taken apart for transport into the mountains and then reassembled when needed. The weapons were designed to be portable. The twelve pound designation means that the cannon shot a twelve pound cannon ball.The Mountain Howitzers were often referred to as “Bull Pups”. The barrel was 38 inches long with a 4.62 bore. These small yet powerful cannons had a range of from about 900 to 1,000 yards.The first models were made in bronze. The later models of the howitzer were affixed to small carriages and these could be pulled along by horse or mule with little trouble.

An interesting story comes from the two Mountain Howitzers on display in Old Town Albuquerque’s plaza. The howitzer’s made there way to Albuquerque during the Civil War when the confederates made a push north into New Mexico. At one time, the Confederates occupied Albuquerque on their way further north. Their advance was stopped at the historic Battle of Glorieta Pass just to the east of Santa Fe. There are two Mountain Howitzers located on the plaza in Old Town Albuquerque just a few miles west of the modern downtown location. These are exact replicas of the cannons that were in place there during the Confederate occupation in 1862.

The Howitzer barrels were buried when the Confederates retreated. In 1889 all eight barrels that were buried were unearthed when an officer returned to the site and showed where they had been buried. Because of the great historical value of these eight barrels they were eventually place in the Albuquerque Museum of Art and History which is located only three blocks northeast of the Old Town plaza. The museum is a great addition to a trip planner for anyone visiting or vacationing in Albuquerque. The exact replica Mountain Howitzers on the plaza today are mounted on “Prairie” gun carriages which were thought to be the type utilized by the Confederate troops.
from http://tripsintohistory.com/tag/howitzer/

Here's a picture of them: Image

(sorry for the lousy picture -- I will try to post one of my good ones sometime!)

Another historic M1841 Mountain Howitzer accompanied John C Freemont ("The Pathfinder") on his expedition, or invasion, if you will, of Mexican California. It seems that, as his force crossed the Sierra Nevadas into California, his Mountain Howitzer went backwards down a canyon. My brother and I always were going to go look for it with metal detectors, as he is familiar with that area of the Sierra Nevadas and felt we might have a chance at finding it. He was of the opinion that the size and weight of the piece caused Fremont's men to possibly "accidentally" slip from their hands and roll back down the mountain.

Later on, it seems as if someone found parts of that gun. You can read that interesting story here:

http://www.longcamp.com/how.html

Another M1841 Mountain Howitzer is to be found at the Big Hole National Battlefield in Southwestern Montana. We visited this place several times, and it is where Col John Gibbon's Infantry caught up with Chief Joseph's Nez Perce band in 1877 on the Big Hole River in Montana. (This is a very sad story, as the Nez Perce left their ancestral lands in the rich Payouse country of Oregon, Washington, and Oregon to achieve freedom in Canada, but they were apprehended by Gen. Nelson A Miles at the Battle of the Bear Paw Mountains, just short of their goal.)

Here is a nice small pic of the battlefield and the lovely Big Hole country of Montana, along with the M1841:

Image

That's a real piece of history you're standing next to, CK!

Thanks for these pics, guys!
Regards,
tim

User avatar
xl_target
Old Timer
Old Timer
Posts: 3480
Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 7:47 am
Location: USA

Re: Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Post by xl_target » Fri Aug 30, 2013 11:00 am

Saturday 24th /Sunday 25th August, 2013

Saturday:
It was getting late on Saturday afternoon and they started closing Ft. Ridgely as we were leaving and so we figured that by the time we would visit the Lower Sioux Agency and the Birch Coulee battlefield, it would be really late.

Besides that I was getting really hungry. I had told the boys at the Train Club in St James that we would have supper with them. On Saturday's we usually do “dinner and a movie” in our club's lounge area. On the way, we tried to call them to tell them to wait for us but had no cell phone coverage out there. When we finally got almost to the outskirts of the city of St James, the phone came alive. When we called them they had just got to the “Subway”. We hurried over there and joined them, getting our own subs. Since I didn't get to the video system in time, the movie we watched was an old digitized train movie from the 1950's. I don't think CK was very impressed with it.

After supper and some gossip, we made plans for the morrow and headed home. Once there we started composing this thread and editing photos. We didn't stay up very long because we had to get up early in the morning.

Sunday:
We got up early, fueled up, bought coffee and went to my friend Chuck's house. There we piled into his van accompanied by his son-in-law Jim and his brother-in-law Mark. We were trying to get there early so we could get a good parking spot and so we wouldn't have to wait in line for too long. We headed out towards Morristown, home of Ahlman's Guns. From my previous posts over the years, some of you are familiar with the place. Every year they have a big summer event for their customers.

Image
The giant cannon at Ahlman's entrance


Image
CK making nice to the Hudson's Bay bull.

Image
Waiting to enter

Immediately upon entering, we came to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources' trailer. Here are trophies confiscated from hunters who have illegally taken animals.

Image
He has nothing to be shameful for.... yet :wink:

Image
Confiscated deer trophies

Image
An illegally taken Bear

Now we will start making the rounds of the gun manufacturer's tables but before we get there, let me leave you with this cautionary photo:

Image
no caption needed

It's pretty late here so I will continue this thread tomorrow.
CK might want to add a few comments in the meantime.......

.
“Never give in, never give in, never; never; never; never – in nothing, great or small, large or petty – never give in except to convictions of honor and good sense” — Winston Churchill, Oct 29, 1941

User avatar
brihacharan
Old Timer
Old Timer
Posts: 3112
Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 3:33 pm
Location: mumbai

Re: Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Post by brihacharan » Fri Aug 30, 2013 11:16 am

Boy! What a wonderful narrative guys :D
Keep em' tumbling, rolling or whatchama call it - Keep em' coming lads :D
Have a rocking week-end :D
Briha

User avatar
dev
Old Timer
Old Timer
Posts: 2528
Joined: Wed Jun 14, 2006 5:16 pm
Location: New Delhi

Re: Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Post by dev » Fri Aug 30, 2013 11:24 am

Love the camping gear. Have been eyeing the Coleman stove for a while but then I found that I had a small gas with a burner and cooking unit on top.
Please to add the bundook shots soon.
Apologies for the pressure but we be starved gun buffs the schemiesers (sp?) are shooting versions?

Regards,

Dev
To ride, to speak up, to shoot straight.

User avatar
Vikram
We post a lot
We post a lot
Posts: 4489
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2006 6:14 am
Location: Tbilisi,Georgia

Re: Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Post by Vikram » Fri Aug 30, 2013 5:26 pm

blood in my alcohol stream!
That was clever! ROTFL
It ain’t over ’til it’s over! "Rocky,Rocky,Rocky....."

User avatar
Moin.
Poster of the Month - Sep '11 & Apr '13
Poster of the Month - Sep '11 & Apr '13
Posts: 1718
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 11:10 am
Location: Gujrat

Re: Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Post by Moin. » Fri Aug 30, 2013 6:08 pm

" Hmm! What are these Indians consorting with a bunch of Nazi's for? "

Dada, what are you doing with them Nazi's :D Bengali Red Neck :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

Regards
Moin.
In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer. Camus

User avatar
gladiatorgarg
Almost at nirvana
Almost at nirvana
Posts: 172
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2010 12:31 pm
Location: india

Re: Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Post by gladiatorgarg » Fri Aug 30, 2013 8:03 pm

awesome..a great outing gentlemen.. :cheers: :cheers: wish you many more such outings keep the camp fire on.. :D

Bhargav
One of Us (Nirvana)
One of Us (Nirvana)
Posts: 300
Joined: Thu Dec 07, 2006 11:42 am
Location: USA

Re: Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Post by Bhargav » Sat Aug 31, 2013 1:46 am

Nice pics!
"I'd much rather go to my grave never needing my gun, than go there wishing I had it."
- Phil Dalmolin

"Know guns, no crime. No guns, know crime."
- Ralph Lauretano

NAGRI ( www.gunowners.in ) - Our future 800 pound gorilla.
Marlin XT-22R in 22lr.

User avatar
TC
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 1805
Joined: Tue Dec 05, 2006 11:50 am
Location: Kolkata

Re: Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Post by TC » Sat Aug 31, 2013 1:54 am

XL and Kalyan dada how come the two of you always have all the fun ? I mean look at those pictures ...This is so unfair :evil: :evil:

Jokes apart, a most wonderful narrative (as always, coming from the two of you :D ) and wonderful pictures. Please keep them coming.

Cheers and best wishes :cheers:

TC

User avatar
xl_target
Old Timer
Old Timer
Posts: 3480
Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 7:47 am
Location: USA

Re: Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Post by xl_target » Sat Aug 31, 2013 11:44 am

Sunday, 25th August, 2013

.... so we walk up to the spot where many of the gun vendors have set up.
There is a range behind this area and all these guns can be tried out at the range.

Image
At the Taurus booth; CK checks out the Taurus/Rossi "Circuit Judge", a revolving rifle/shotgun that shoots .45 Colt (long colt) or .410 shotshells interchangably.

Image
Here he examines a revolver, "The Judge", that shoots the same cartridges.

Image
At the Ruger booth; checking out the Ruger LC9 pistol

Image
..and the Ruger 22/45 "Lite"

Image
..at the Glock booth

Image
..at the Smith & Wesson booth; checking out one of their M&P (Military & Police) semi-autos.

Image
.....by the Springfield Armory booth

Image
Here he is shooting a (full-auto) Thompson sub-machine gun.


more to come...........
“Never give in, never give in, never; never; never; never – in nothing, great or small, large or petty – never give in except to convictions of honor and good sense” — Winston Churchill, Oct 29, 1941

ckkalyan
Veteran
Veteran
Posts: 1420
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 10:37 pm
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Contact:

Re: Midwest Meetup! (Pix Heavy)

Post by ckkalyan » Sat Aug 31, 2013 2:12 pm

Sun 25th Ahlman’s Shooters Round up, Morristown MN

The plan for the day was that XL’s friend Chuck would pick us up in his Ford Windstar Van and drive us to Morristown. His son-in-law Jim and his brother-in-law Mark would join us at Chuck’s home and then we head on together to the site of all the action.

We arrived 45 minutes later at Chuck’s place a large well cared for home where we helloed Jim and Mark and we were soon on our way. An hour’s drive brought us to Morristown, I by now had got used to the ‘original prairie’ scene – corn and soybean crops on either side of the highway, stands of windbreak trees around farmhouses with occasional glimpses of the blue river through them.

Image
The Prairie Landscape on the way to Morristown

I also noticed tall grain silos, old ‘A’ frame Barns, rolls of hay and a few ethanol plants. Producing ethanol from corn is the SOP in MN, which XL explained to me is ‘somewhat opposed’ by the Petroleum Producers lobby. Duh! :)

We soon drew up to a large open parking area found a spot and headed to the entrance of the event “Ahlman’s Shooters Roundup”

We made our way across the line-up to enter the show with anticipation; we crossed the ferryman’s hand with the traditional silver coin, collected our fluorescent green wristbands and we were in! Hooray! :)

Welcome to Ahlman’s Shooters Roundup!

I thought - a veritable Mecca for Gun Lovers!

I am happy to add a lot more of my experience here at the show….which is probably the highlight of the visit. This internet connection of mine is driving me up the wall!? :( Just when I am ready to post, make corrections, add images – it goes dead on me – Arrgghhh! :cry:

We browsed around dozens of arms vendor’s stalls, where they usually had hand guns displayed on tables. If you liked to try some of them, all you had to do was ask and then they asked for your Driver's License, handed you the gun and asked you to go behind them to the test area, where ammo was free and you could check it out 100% free. Return the gun and you got your Driver's License back. That was it! :lol:

At other places one could try out long guns and machine guns (I kid you not) to your hearts content for a small charge for the ammo. For example – fire a Tommy Gun for $20 – 20 Rounds; Brands like Bennelli, Remington Shotgun shoot 4 shots for $2, and then………….many more of a similar vein...PHEW! You need shoulders of steel and very few $!

The legendary .357 Magnum Coonan Automatic Pistol - $1 per shot

Image
The Coonan Booth - "Nothing left to envy" :)
They also make receivers for FN FAL rifles as you can see from the FALs on display

Image
Mon Dieu! The Coonan .357 Mag Semi auto pistol.

What a weapon the Coonan .357 Magnum is to fire, minimal recoil for such a big bore, with such a sensitive trigger – I had the first few shots going even before I thought they would be away! Ah, that was an experience that I shall never forget!

Image
Firing the Coonan

Even more unforgettable, is that I had the extreme honour of meeting the inventive genius whose brainchild it was, Dan Coonan himself – introduced very kindly by XL! Dan, I soon realized, is such an unassuming person and a wonderful human being – very down to earth - I was truly humbled by the man and his creation! WOW!

Image
Here I am telling Dan Coonan not to sell Baljit a Coonan ROTFL

I checked out their display weapons and asked if I could have one custom made for me say a 1911 version with my choice of finish, colour, butt plates with my initials / logo – whatever….and they said “sure whatever you want”.

Image
A custom pistol for someone who read "The Phantom" as a kid?

Then we enjoyed some amazing deals of the day like ‘Shoot 4 Machine guns - 120 Rounds for $60’ that included an AK47, an M16 (silenced or otherwise), an Uzi and a Tommy gun – WOW, what an opportunity! These guns were being fired by so many people in line, that and reasonably so, they were getting really hot, so hot, that the facilitator had to resort to liberal doses of WD-40 and releasing the jammed actions of the weapons every so often. He even gave us one single glove (left or right) so that we could grab the fore-end to fire in relative comfort! PHEW!

I must say here that XL’s friend from the Railroad Model Club and a founding member, Chuck was kind enough to take responsibility of shooting videos throughout the show. What an amazing person Chuck is; he was there everywhere, where the action was on, with his tiny handheld Video Camera that looked like a phone.

Chuck is an incredible person with a wonderful sense of humour, the better he gets to know you the more he warms up to you and cracks jokes mercilessly - and then you think he is high on Coke or something all the time!? Well he is in a way, considering that he has worked with Coca Cola for the past 30+ something years – LOL! :lol:

What an amazing human being! Kudos to him and my heartfelt thanks for his efforts at the video throughout the show! Thank you Chuck, Mark and Jim (and of course XL, for making it possible for me to be in MN) for making my day!

:cheers:

more....work in progress........... :D
When guns are outlawed, only outlaws will have guns!

Post Reply