Tips from a Trainer

All shooting sports - ISSF/ IPSC/ HFT/ Sporting Clays etc.
partheus
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Re: Tips from a Trainer

Post by partheus » Tue Apr 13, 2021 4:15 pm

That's an interesting technique. I certainly be trying this out :) I thought the centerfire record was 595 by Chirstian Reitz of Germany though. I believe he shot a Pardini HP.

Can I also ask, how much in your opinion do personal preferences matter when it comes to guns? I am a lefty and went with a left handed Steyr Evo 10 because it was the one I worked with and had access to.

Only, when I got it, I realized the grip wasn't the same as that on the right handed models. The Steyr Evo 10 has its cocking mechanism on the left of the gun. Consequently, the left handed grip is considerably thicker than what you'll find on the right as there's a bit of space cut out in the grip to accommodate the cocking lever.

I could barely reach the trigger even when I adjusted it all the way to the back even though this was never a problem on the right handed Steyrs. I then got a new thinner grip made, but the gun still sits weirdly to the right of my holding hand and at least in my case, likes to point high and left when I hold it most naturally.

Now I can pivot my wrist to bring the sights into alignment but it really makes for a very awkward hold. I've had the new grip for a little over 2 months now and while it has helped with the trigger reach, getting the sights into alignment is still an issue.

My question is, should I just keep training or shall I save up and go for a new pistol? I wasted a whole year trying to learn how to shoot with that fat grip the pistol came with, and got no where. So, I am a little hesitant to keep trying now as it may mean more wasted time.

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Raj Khalid
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Re: Tips from a Trainer

Post by Raj Khalid » Wed Apr 14, 2021 9:49 am

I think most of us have a moment in life when we think "If only I had the time" well since last year all of us have had adequate time on our hands. I think this is a great opportunity to build up some fitness and to train with dry firing.
If you only do this from now on, I guarantee you that your shooting will improve.
Dry firing means training in all seriousness, with your regular clothes and shoes which you wear to the range and then concentrating for at least 30 min to start with. I can then suggest some interesting exercises you can try and home for your dry firing

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pistolero
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Re: Tips from a Trainer

Post by pistolero » Wed Apr 14, 2021 5:15 pm

Mr. Raj Khalid good to hear from you. Its been a long time since MRA. I remember the Metal plate and bell which were put up on the old 10 meter range. Great memories from long ago.

Hope you are well.

Regards
-P
"Whatever is begun in anger ends in shame."

Raj Khalid
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Tips from a Trainer Stay Focussed during lockdown

Post by Raj Khalid » Mon May 03, 2021 11:03 am

Do you recall the first time you shot a pistol at 25 metres? Chances are that you followed the Basic Principles and get a good group. Later on as you became 'smarter" and learnt "secrets" your groups probably got larger? My conclusion from this is simple "Shooting is a skill that is easy to learn and easier to forget" Unless you are reinforcing the basic principles of a good shot every day your will lose your skills.

Knowing how to shoot is no solution to actually shooting well, you have to keep the reflexes and muscles honed.

In this time of lockdown in most places in India, and maybe a larger lockdown looming ahead, it is important to continue to train at home by the simple principle of Dry Firing. Do not give this up, an hours spent each day in dry firing may actually improve your scores when shooting opens up.

If you find dry firing boring or not fulfilling enough get a training aid to make things more interesting.

Raj Khalid
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Centre Fire World Record T D Smith

Post by Raj Khalid » Mon May 03, 2021 11:11 am

Sorry for my lack of knowledge about navigating this forum but I thought I saw a question about someone using a left hand grip on a Steyr. Please repost your query and I will answer this.

Raj Khalid
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Re: Tips from a Trainer

Post by Raj Khalid » Mon May 03, 2021 11:15 am

Partheus
I suggest, and this is my Opinion only, if you cannot be comfortable with your pistol and grip don't struggle.
Try and sell your current pistol, maybe need to fit a RH Grip to get a better price.
Then try out a few pistols with a left hand grip and see how this feels in your hand.


When you lift the pistol with your eyes closed, and lower it somewhere on target, your sights MUST be aligned.
That is natural aim.

Your shooting will improve if you can do this.

Let me know how you get on.

partheus
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Re: Tips from a Trainer

Post by partheus » Mon May 03, 2021 2:56 pm

Thank you, Raj. But, that's the problem in India. Ranges barely keep 1-2 pistols for those without one. Their reasoning is share until you're ready to buy your own. In most ranges, you'd find either a Steyr or a Morini. The latter being rare.

I can't find any range with any other pistols and while I did hear mention of Pardini and an old Walther with one range, both were right handed. My experience with Steyr has left me in a bind. I was sure I knew what I was going to get. Only, it was anything but.

Now, my gut tells me to go with the new Walther LP 500 series as the cocking lever is on the top, so the grip with work the same way left and right. Secondly, while Pardini does the same Walther has a large selection of grips from regular to small and even slim. These options are unavailable in other products. I will try and get the pistol when things start getting back to normal and post a more detailed review when I can.

Cheers and thanks for sharing what you know! :cheers:

Raj Khalid
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HOLDING EXERCISES IN LOCKDOWN

Post by Raj Khalid » Tue May 25, 2021 5:26 pm

In this lockdown when we cannot go and train, it is a very good opportunity to break down the shot process into all the components and train on each one.
Holding your pistol is one important aspect. We all know that we have to apply front to back pressure on the grip and it is my submission that we have to hold the pistol as hard as we can without any tremor.

A good exercise for this is just to take your stance, grip the pistol and raise it to the aiming area on a blank wall and grip the pistol as hard as you can, till you can feel the muscles in your forearm working. Hold for 45 seconds and then lower the pistol, relax for 2 minutes and repeat. DO NOT APPLY PRESSURE ON THE TRIGGER.
Do this 10 times and then put away the pistol. DO this for 10 days then move on to dry firing. You should be able to grip the pistol hard, keep the sights steady and release the trigger with no change in sight picture.

rahulbdelhi
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Re: Tips from a Trainer

Post by rahulbdelhi » Mon Jun 07, 2021 5:03 pm

Hello Raj sir. Thanks for sharing this drill, its very helpful. I have one question for 10m air pistol.

When I grip the pistol hard, my thumb automatically curls inwards and applies pressure of the grip. I had read somewhere that the thumb shouldn't apply any pressure on the grip, rather it should just loosely rest on the grip. But this seems very un-natural to me.
Please advise.

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